KEY ELEMENTS OF NEGOTIATION: GENERATING OPTIONS FOR MUTUAL GAIN.

Fisher, Ury and Patton (1981), recommend the invention or generation of options for mutual gain. By searching for and generating options you avoid the mindset of having to negotiate over a fixed pie. Instead, you promote an abundance mindset as you seek to expand the pie and create value. This may involve trading across differences […]

KEY ELEMENTS OF NEGOTIATION – LEGITIMACY

LEGITIMACY – USING AND RELYING UPON FAIR, OBJECTIVE STANDARDS The use of objective, fair standards or criteria is an effective method of dealing with claims or proposals based upon emotions or desires during negotiation.Fisher, Ury and Patton recommend that we should frame issues under negotiation around objective criteria based upon: • Fair standards• Fair processes They […]

KEY ELEMENTS OF NEGOTIATION – COMMITMENT

Lewicki, Saunders and Minton (1997) describe commitment, as a key concept of negotiation, to taking a bargaining position with a pledge regarding a future intended course of action’. Once made, commitments may reduce your own and the other party’s range of options – for this reason it is important that you seek to prevent the […]

THE CONCEPT OF COLLABORATION

Drawing from the literature and for the purpose of my research, I have settled on the following definition of the concept of collaboration: ‘A social process, involving conscious joint effort and cooperation between two or more parties to voluntarily pool their diverse complementary expertise, perspectives, knowledge, skills and resources for the purpose of achieving a […]

COLLABORATIVE ENTEPRISE

My current research explores the value of negotiation training as a catalyst and accelerator of collaborative enterprise. My research explores and attempts to find answers to questions such as what collaboration and collaboration enterprise means, why collaborative enterprise is an important topic of research, how Negotiation and Collaboration may be aligned and how this may […]

WHY COLLABORATIVE ENTERPRISE?

So why have I chosen Collaborative Enterprise as my research topic? Quite simply, the answer is that collaborative enterprise, or collaborative, networked organizations have emerged as the most approrpriate organizational form for today’s global environment and economy. Why is this so? As we transition out of the industrial economy to a more relational, knowledge based […]

KEY ELEMENTS INDICATING THE STRENGTH AND HEALTH OF A COLLABORATIVE ENTEPRISE

As part of my research I have identified the following key elements that indicate the health and strength of collaborative organisations.- • History of working together – also referred to as Heritage relationships – poor relationship history is a challenge for collaboration • Mutual Concern (interests) – aligning self-interests into collective interests – motivation is […]

NEGOTIATION AS A CORE ORGANISATIONAL COMPETENCY

I recently, responded to a SPANS negotiation forum discussion thread involving the leading question ‘Does Mutual Gains training pay off’. The question linked to an observation by Lawrence Susskind and Hallam Movius in their book ‘Built to Win: Creating a World Class Negotiating ‘ suggesting that one off, stand-alone negotiation training does little to develop […]

HERDING CATS – FROM CONFLICT TO COLLABORATION

Warren Bennis in his book of the same title, claims that managing people is like herding cats.  Of course, as Bennis points out, Cats won’t allow themselves to be herded –  they can however, be persuaded, influenced and led toward a common purpose.  The key message here is that management is becoming less relevant in […]

Mary Parker Follett – Pioneer of Modern Management and Negotiation theory

Mary Parker Follett was referred to by Peter Drucker as the prophet of management – Follett viewed bureaucratic organisations with their hierarchical forms as basically being unfit for purpose and preferred the concepts of network organisational forms, collaboration, and integrative bargaining – essentially the idea of people working together to achieve more than they could […]